Standing Ovation: Performing Social Science Research About Cancer (Ethnographic Alternatives)

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03Review
Standing Ovation is less a how-to guide for other research-based theatre than an inspiration for such work. Each project, the authors realize, must discover its own way; there is absolutely no method. But listed here is a look backstage with the fears, frustrations, and ultimately the triumphs of production. (Arthur W. Frank, through the Foreword)

Hats away and off to these investigators for reflecting both physician and patient perspectives with humor, in a way that is neither reductive nor competitive, and then for honoring profound needs. (Barbara Mains Medscape Women’s Health Ejournal (Posted 10/03/2002))

It is usually a compelling, informative, and uplifting experience to witness this performance as well as read the way it was constructed… The book and videotape are valuable addendums to the small but lively performance ethnography scene. . . . In addition to bringing forth very useful ideas about precisely how to do performative/research work, they are also very provocative regarding helping people experience disease and connect with others who are afflicted. (Gergen, Mary Forum: Qualitative Social Research Vol. 4, No. 3, Sept. ’03)

The authors, a social scientist and also a psychosocial and behavioral health administrator, describe the entire process of blending the experience of experiencing cancer and also the dissemination of the findings via a live theater audience…The authors are careful to make a vivid description on the cast members’ involvement at the same time and their emotional responses to being so closely aligned while using disease…[They] answer “yes” to your question, “Is using theatrical performance an affordable way to communicate the effects of social science research to healthcare providers and also the public?” (Janic Phillips, PhD, RN, FAAN Oncology Nursing Forum, Vol. 30, No 5, 2003)

[The book is] a prosperous attempt to link social-science research to drama and performs in practice what many social scientists only do on paper: it listens. . . . A very useful tool to say the cancer experience to physicians, patients and carers. (Lorraine Fincham Medical Sociology News, Vol. 29, No. 3, Winter 2003)

The authors, a social scientist as well as a psychosocial and behavioral health administrator, describe the whole process of blending the experience of living alongside cancer as well as the dissemination of the findings via a live theater audience…The authors are carefulto make a vivid description from the cast members’ involvement in the operation and their emotional responses to being so closely aligned while using disease…[They] answer yes on the question, Is the utilization of theatrical performance an affordable way to communicate the final results of social science research to healthcare providers as well as the public? (Janic Phillips, PhD, RN, FAAN Oncology Nursing Forum, Vol. 30, No 5, 2003)

Bravo! Humanistic psychology at its best! The authors of Standing Ovation demonstrate the power of group search and driven the golden spike inside railway to spiritual consciousness. (Duncan B. Blewett, PhD)

An original and courageous try to make patient-centered research and its particular results more easily accessible to those whose concerns are really at stake. . . . The process of describing the dramas is impressively described. . . . The authors of Standing Ovation has to be complimented for just a very personal, honest and thoughtful account products they have: fears and concerns, joys and victories, ambivilence and uncertainties, struggles and unclarities, nearness and loyalty, (Hanneke de Haes Health Expectations, 7, 2004)
About the Author
Ross Gray is Co-Director in the Psychosocial & Behavioural Research Unit at Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre and Assistant Professor, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto. Christina Sinding is often a social scientist together with the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation Community Research Initiative plus a Ph.D. candidate inside Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto.

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